Our CEO Kyle Golding is quoted (twice!) is this informative post on the Insureon Small Business Blog. Read his full advice for using an e-newsletter to build audience below and then read the full blog post here.

Query: I’d like to hear from marketing consultants who specialize in email marketing.1. How do newsletters help a small business grow?

Creating a newsletter (print or electronic) gives small business the ability to communicate directly with their audience with complete control of message, timing, repetition and customization. Direct marketing, such as a newsletter, allow a small business to make multiple variations of information, offers or other parameters specific to each recipient group.

2. Are there signs that a business could benefit from sending out a newsletter? 

If your product or service is unique, has a loyal following, benefits from word-of-mouth promotions you should consider a newsletter. If your sales cycles are highly seasonal, newsletters can capture audience attention during peak times and push offers, promotions during slow periods. If your business benefits from being front-of-mind with consumers, newsletters are a great tool. 

3. What are the important elements to include in a small business newsletter? 

The essential elements to a great small business newsletter include consistent branding elements, contact and location information, hours of operation, social media and other digital links. These elements should be part of a template. Next comes compelling content, not just promotional information. Give your audience great reasons to read the newsletter outside of “what’s on sale” spam messaging. Communication is a two way street. Incorporate audience feedback such as surveys or polls. If your newsletter is interesting and helpful, the audience will want to share it and the content with others. Make it easy to share content and sign up information.
Communication is a two way street.
From Blogger Virginia Hamill: Thanks for sharing your thoughts on email newsletters for small business. I think my favorite part was the comment about communication being a two-way street. That’s always been true, but I doubt many SBOs think about that when creating their marketing plan.
insureon-blog-page

Golding Group CEO Kyle Golding interviewed by Ann Brown for The Network Journal.
December 1st, 2016

screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-1-49-27-pmYour lifestyle is your unique experience. And that experience is brandable. That’s what Amy Oestreicher found out. She has used her life experiences, good and bad, to inspire others. Today, Oestreicher is a PTSD peer-to-peer specialist, an artist, author, health advocate, as well as a TEDx speaker.

Like Oestreicher, many others can also brand their lifestyle. Here, Oestreicher gives the how-to–and why:

TNJ.com: Can you actually brand your lifestyle?

“Yes, you can brand anything that has substance to it (content that can be consumed or understood). Branding is simply explaining why someone should be interested in what you are presenting to them,” explains Kyle Golding of The Golding Group, a strategic growth services firm.

TNJ.com: How can you tell if your lifestyle is brand-able?

“You can research others doing the same or similar to what your lifestyle brand would/could be as a potential indicator, but you won’t know 100 percent what it is until you try it,” Golding points out.

TNJ.com: Why should you brand your lifestyle?

“Branding your lifestyle is creating potential influential or economic value from something you are already doing, have access to and are paying for. The benefit of documenting and sharing is completely value added, but only if the lifestyle is completely authentic to you. You must actually live this lifestyle. Sports, arts, travel, business or other topic that you legitimately are engaged in before creating a brand around it. You can try to fake it, but the public will figure you out eventually,” says Golding.

TNJ.com: Three steps on branding your lifestyle

1. Who are you? Who do you want to reach? “Define what your lifestyle is and why an audience would be attracted, who that audience is (and is not),” advises Golding.

2. How will you reach your audience? “Choose your platforms (Twitter, Instagram, website, etc.), your tactics (text, photos, video, etc.), and your ‘brand voice” (serious, sexy, funny, authoritarian, etc.),” offers Golding.

3. Reach out. “Start documenting, sharing and engaging your potential audience,” says Golding.

SmartCities Innovation Summit Asia brings together leading cities and their respective leadership to prospect and partner with innovative technology and service providers.Felicite in Korea

 

OVF Member ProfileThe Golding Group Connects with the Audience by Lori Williams for OVF.

He tames redwood by night and develops businesses by day, but Kyle Golding’s jobs don’t end there. The owner of The Golding Group and Share Furniture is also a venture capitalist and a partner in the 1219 Creative Co-Work Space + Art Gallery. “An organic, natural approach is the best way to get people to connect with your product or service,” says the chief strategic idealist who’s as comfortable polishing business plans as he is sanding gnarled wood.

Those slabs of redwood were destined for the landfill until Kyle Golding rescued them from the dumpster. “The cut-off pieces are the hard sections with knotholes,” says Kyle, who fused the three sections into a table. “I almost cut my hand off a couple times while I sanded out some of the roughness. But I kept as much of the natural element as possible.”

At The Golding Group, Kyle also fits pieces of his clients’ stories together into a marketable platform. “As a business owner, you need to connect with the right audience for all the right reasons,” says the CEO. “People don’t even care what your product or service costs as long as they can associate with you for the reasons they find important.”

“We create systems that allow business owners to focus on the real story and the real audience. That way, they avoid the habit of using a snappy ad campaign to sell something based on price or a list of features that has nothing to do with the actual product or company.” 

“The hardest work we do is identifying the real target audience,” says Golding, “and a lot of people are not ready for it because they’re afraid of turning down opportunity.” Kyle, on the other hand, is very comfortable turning down opportunities that do not mesh with his company’s modus operandi. “When we ask clients who their customers are, and they say, ‘Everyone,’ I’m not going to do business with them.” 

“That’s because, unless you’re selling oxygen, everyone is not your customer.”  

Nailing down the customer base is something Kyle’s been doing since he was a teenager. “I played guitar for a rock group before I started doing sound for local bands on the weekends,” he says. That gig led to the formation of a production company while Golding was still in college. “As an audio engineer I did national and international shows,” he says. “The most challenging tour was for Nine Inch Nails because their audio and video feeds had to sync without the audience hearing the cues for the band.”

These days, Kyle sits behind a desk instead of a control panel. But his decidedly untraditional office is at 1219 Creative Co-Work Space + Art Gallery on N. Classen Blvd in Oklahoma City.  “At The Golding Group, we set ourselves apart from other business development professionals because we rely heavily on creativity,” he says. Thus his decision to offer co-working spaces as well as large and small offices for lease on a monthly basis. “My co-workers and I like to be around like-minded people because there’s an energy in that kind of environment. It’s been very good for all of us.”

“Everyone who’s in an office at 1219 started at one of the co-work desks,” says Kyle. Although it’s not an official incubator, business lessons rub off on the lessees as readily as linseed oil lends gleam to a table. “When people move out of the co-work desks and into one of our office spaces,” says Kyle, “their businesses are turning into successes.”

IABC-OKC Guest Speaker 8/4/16

Stop selling by features or price points. Tell a story, give an experience, create an attitude, embrace a lifestyle. Connect to your audience in deep, powerful ways for true loyalty. Let’s talk about how to make it happen on a regular basis.

Relationship-based content marketing can take your brand well past a logo and cutline to true fan club status. Watch the video for a ton of great information about how to best connect and create relationships with your best customer through your brand story: Simple, True, Consistent.

Kyle Golding

Kyle Golding is a born #BusinessBuilder with more than 30 years of experience building, owning and operating multiple businesses. Golding has positioned, marketed and managed artist, musicians, start-ups, corporations and non-profits to local, national and worldwide success. Golding has won over 30 business marketing awards and honors, including 6 IABC Bronze Quill Awards. Along with The Golding Group, he also owns Share Furniture, is a partner at 1219 Creative Co-Work Space + Art Gallery and has investments in multiple start-ups/venture projects. Golding was featured in the February 2016 issue of Entrepreneur Magazine aboutWhat It Takes To Be A Creative Entrepreneur.”

Join our CEO Kyle Golding for serious marketing + casual conversation + cold brew at Beers And Branding on August 18th at the Tower Theater in OKC. Informal, high-level discussion about branding and audience development with a focus on alternative tactics and digital tools best suited for modern audiences. Professionals informing professionals while enjoying a local beverage from Anthem Brewing Co

Join us for an informative brand and audience building round-table hosted by Kyle Golding in the casual setting of Tower Studio (home of the WAFTI podcast). We’re going to challenge traditional ideas of marketing, providing new and interesting ideas and insights into strategy, tactics and measurement. The audience will very much be part of the conversation. Ask questions, get answers and add your thoughts to the mix.

Seating will be limited (25) to ensure a quality experience and plenty of Anthem beer for all attendees. This free quarterly event will sell out, all attendees must reserve their spot on has Sold Out, but you can get on our Waiting List for possible tickets or cancellations, information about our next event and other insider only communications. Each hour-long event will also be live streamed and recorded, but that won’t get you free beer. Attendees will be treaded to Anthem Brewing and/or Ozarka water as our treat for participating.

Sign up for the #BeersAndBranding e-new here for updates and the latest info. about our next event in November.

This is not “how we’ve always done it” marketing advice. Grab a beer and let’s talk about branding on a whole new level. A project of Naked City OKC.

The Grasshopper Startup/Small Business Blog recently asked our CEO Kyle Golding and several other business owners two important questions on the topic of writing a modern business plan in 2016.

Here are my answers. If you want to know more, contact Kyle here.

What’s the difference between modern and traditional business plans?

Speed and technology. Modern business plans are still built on traditional business models, but have to take into account the speed at which products are developed, enter the market, and are upgraded. The barrier to entry for new business is lower than ever. A business can be started and see success for much less up-front commitment than ever before thanks to modern technology. Production, marketing, internal communications, customer acquisition, etc. are all easier to manage and more effective today, but only if incorporated into the business plan and executed at a high level.

Screen Shot 2016-06-02 at 10.33.31 AM

What questions should every business plan answer?
  • Who, What, When, Why, Where, How and For How Much.
  • Who are we as a company/brand and who is our primary and secondary audience?
  • What are we offering them, at what value?
  • When are they buying/paying for it and how often?
  • Why is our product/service needed and why do they choose us over others?
  • Where do they purchase and at what cost to us?
  • How does our audience decide to purchase and how do we influence them? How do we speak to and listen to our target audience?
  • How much can we charge the consumer with all real cost and margins included to be competitive and profitable? The reason to run business is to be profitable.

 

These strategies can boost productivity and reduce workplace frustrations.

Our favorite of the 5 top tips is from our own Felicite Moorman. Her suggestion is #3: Implement a “power hour”

Bulogic Felicite

As an alternative to breakfast with email, Felicite Moorman, CEO of BuLogics, which designs, builds and certifies wireless solutions for #IoT The Internet of Things, recommends everyone in the company take a “power hour” at 10 each morning.

“A power hour is a deep, uninterrupted dive into the hardest, most challenging thing on their list,” Moorman says. “Our mental energies are at their highest and everyone in accomplishment mode creates an intensity, and respect for that intensity that is palpable.”

She adds that even if you can’t do a team-wide power hour, the tactic provides a great way for individuals to get a feeling of efficacy and efficiency that lasts the whole day.

Read the full article from US News and World Report