Entrepreneurs crave growth to help them push through the doubts and frustrations which plague them. Kyle Golding of The Golding Group had these same issues, and that’s why he turned everything inside out to build his businesses. We talk to Kyle about his entrepreneurial experiences and what he can do for listeners.

Questions Asked and Answered:⠀

How did The Golding Group come about?⠀
• Is there a sameness in the corporate world?⠀
• For Kyle, what does building from the inside-out mean?⠀
• How does Kyle’s company help small businesses grow when they have a limited budget?⠀
• Is customizable marketing the future? Is it here?⠀
• Is it easier bringing in a client then maintaining them?⠀
• What has helped Kyle unfrustrate himself from issues during the run of his business?⠀
• How important is honesty in a business??⠀

Show Follow-Ups: ⠀
• Learn more about The Golding Group at their website or Kyle’s Twitter feed
• For Your Thinking Cap: Kiss and Say Goodbye to Your Corporate Job⠀
• Advertise on The Unfrustrated Entrepreneur⠀
• Be a Guest on The Unfrustrated Entrepreneur⠀

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Excerpt from the Merchant Maverick article What’s the Best Way To Get a Loan For My New Business? featuring quotes from The Golding Group CEO Kyle Golding among others….

Perhaps it’s an understatement to say that starting a business is hard work. With countless judgment calls, details to attend to, plans to make, and business-related things to learn, quite frankly, it’s a wonder that anybody starts a successful business.

One of the biggest decisions an entrepreneur with a fledgling business has to make is how to fund their business. Funding is notoriously difficult for business startups to attain; but on the other hand, additional funding could really jump-start your business.

Should you seek outside funding? If so, when? Making those judgment calls can be hard. We’ve asked some successful entrepreneurs how they’ve funded their business, and here’s what we learned…

Most Start with Bootstrapping

Most entrepreneurs started with bootstrapping. In fact, according to a survey performed by The Alternative Board (TAB), two-thirds of small business owners surveyed self-funded their business.

The co-founder of VORTTX Training and Testing, Kyle Golding, has a similar story. Golding and his partner wanted to make sure they had a feasible idea before investing money in their business:

Our approach was putting some personal money (neither of us mortgaged a house or anything with risk) into the basics like website, trade show display and digital marketing (less than $5,000 total) to very strategically approach the most likely audience only. This laser focus might seem too risky to some but we knew each limited dollar spent was going directly at a very likely target.

Golding advises that,

The most important thing to do is determine if you have a profitable business concept, not how fast can [you] get funding for the first version of a product or next great idea. . . . If you play the long game with hustle and patience, you can build something not only profitable but sustainable.

Read the full article here. 

Now open, The Manhattan OKC is a new and exciting part of the Rococo Restaurants brand. From concept to opening day, this is one of our favorite projects to date. We still have a few very minor details to add/change but the kitchen and bar are ready to serve you. Lunch begins every day at 11:00am and Happy Hour menu runs at 4:00pm until close (10:00pm weeknights, later on weekends and after special events like Civic Center shows, Thunder games, etc.). Make sure to sign up for the email list and follow The Manhattan OKC on social media (Facebook, Twitter & Instagram) for the latest news, special hours, featured food & drink, etc.

Check out our Lunch, Happy Hour and Drink menus, then visit The Manhattan OKC, your NEW neighborhood bar in downtown OKC.

Golding Group co-founder Kyle Golding recently contributed to several articles about future trends in business such as Content Marketing, Consulting and B2B Marketing.

Check out his advice along with a lot of other smart people) here:

 

A business is more than a collection of assets and liabilities. It is also a group of people, and the way that those people interact always has a large influence on how the business does. A company that has a positive culture will have employees that are invested in the business and want to see it succeed. They will also feel comfortable asking questions and offering solutions for discussion. That will boost the odds of finding a solution to every problem, and cause people to come up with new ways to help the business grow.

Encourage Questions
Misunderstandings can lead to accidents and other problems, but people are often embarrassed to ask for clarification. Managers should try to foster a culture where people feel comfortable asking any questions that they might have. This will cut down on mistakes in the office and it can make the explainer think about things that they had not considered. Make this change by ensuring that people are never made to feel foolish for asking their questions. Managers should lead by example and feel free to ask questions of their own, since that demonstrates to everyone else that asking is acceptable.

Promote Diversity
The best results almost always occur when a team looks at a wide variety of options from different perspectives. That allows them to identify the best course of action, and then work through any flaws in the plan. Since people who come from similar backgrounds often have similar ideas, the best way to encourage that system is to develop a diverse workforce. To do so, try to encourage workers to interact with as many different types of people as possible. If you have any ongoing partnerships with other businesses, watch them closely to see if they have any policies that you should adopt.

Recognize Success
Too many managers dwell on failures without recognizing success, but it’s much better to do the opposite. Workers will be more motivated if they know that their successes will get noticed. Similarly, focusing on failures without applauding success creates a workforce that is more interested in avoiding public mistakes than in attaining excellence. This is one of the easiest cultural changes for most managers to implement. Simply congratulate workers when they do well, and make sure that any disciplinary actions are kept as private as possible.

Look for Honesty
Honesty is a virtue. People sometimes notice flaws in business plans, but decide not to point them out because they feel that their manager will take any criticism as an insult. That leads to businesses making expensive mistakes that they could easily have avoided. Solve that problem by making it clear that your business would rather have honest discussions than flattery. Be sure to thank people who offer their honest perspectives, and make a point of responding to them in a positive way. If it seems like their perspective is wrong, it isn’t necessary to follow their advice, but it is important to make it clear that you have considered their statements. Doing that will make it clear that they aren’t being ignored, which encourages them to speak up again in the future.

Author Bio: Brian Rees is a media relations representative for FB Solutions. In his spare time, he enjoys writing, music, and spending time outside.

Our CEO Kyle Golding is quoted (twice!) is this informative post on the Insureon Small Business Blog. Read his full advice for using an e-newsletter to build audience below and then read the full blog post here.

Query: I’d like to hear from marketing consultants who specialize in email marketing.1. How do newsletters help a small business grow?

Creating a newsletter (print or electronic) gives small business the ability to communicate directly with their audience with complete control of message, timing, repetition and customization. Direct marketing, such as a newsletter, allow a small business to make multiple variations of information, offers or other parameters specific to each recipient group.

2. Are there signs that a business could benefit from sending out a newsletter? 

If your product or service is unique, has a loyal following, benefits from word-of-mouth promotions you should consider a newsletter. If your sales cycles are highly seasonal, newsletters can capture audience attention during peak times and push offers, promotions during slow periods. If your business benefits from being front-of-mind with consumers, newsletters are a great tool. 

3. What are the important elements to include in a small business newsletter? 

The essential elements to a great small business newsletter include consistent branding elements, contact and location information, hours of operation, social media and other digital links. These elements should be part of a template. Next comes compelling content, not just promotional information. Give your audience great reasons to read the newsletter outside of “what’s on sale” spam messaging. Communication is a two way street. Incorporate audience feedback such as surveys or polls. If your newsletter is interesting and helpful, the audience will want to share it and the content with others. Make it easy to share content and sign up information.
Communication is a two way street.
From Blogger Virginia Hamill: Thanks for sharing your thoughts on email newsletters for small business. I think my favorite part was the comment about communication being a two-way street. That’s always been true, but I doubt many SBOs think about that when creating their marketing plan.
insureon-blog-page

SmartCities Innovation Summit Asia brings together leading cities and their respective leadership to prospect and partner with innovative technology and service providers.Felicite in Korea

 

OVF Member ProfileThe Golding Group Connects with the Audience by Lori Williams for OVF.

He tames redwood by night and develops businesses by day, but Kyle Golding’s jobs don’t end there. The owner of The Golding Group and Share Furniture is also a venture capitalist and a partner in the 1219 Creative Co-Work Space + Art Gallery. “An organic, natural approach is the best way to get people to connect with your product or service,” says the chief strategic idealist who’s as comfortable polishing business plans as he is sanding gnarled wood.

Those slabs of redwood were destined for the landfill until Kyle Golding rescued them from the dumpster. “The cut-off pieces are the hard sections with knotholes,” says Kyle, who fused the three sections into a table. “I almost cut my hand off a couple times while I sanded out some of the roughness. But I kept as much of the natural element as possible.”

At The Golding Group, Kyle also fits pieces of his clients’ stories together into a marketable platform. “As a business owner, you need to connect with the right audience for all the right reasons,” says the CEO. “People don’t even care what your product or service costs as long as they can associate with you for the reasons they find important.”

“We create systems that allow business owners to focus on the real story and the real audience. That way, they avoid the habit of using a snappy ad campaign to sell something based on price or a list of features that has nothing to do with the actual product or company.” 

“The hardest work we do is identifying the real target audience,” says Golding, “and a lot of people are not ready for it because they’re afraid of turning down opportunity.” Kyle, on the other hand, is very comfortable turning down opportunities that do not mesh with his company’s modus operandi. “When we ask clients who their customers are, and they say, ‘Everyone,’ I’m not going to do business with them.” 

“That’s because, unless you’re selling oxygen, everyone is not your customer.”  

Nailing down the customer base is something Kyle’s been doing since he was a teenager. “I played guitar for a rock group before I started doing sound for local bands on the weekends,” he says. That gig led to the formation of a production company while Golding was still in college. “As an audio engineer I did national and international shows,” he says. “The most challenging tour was for Nine Inch Nails because their audio and video feeds had to sync without the audience hearing the cues for the band.”

These days, Kyle sits behind a desk instead of a control panel. But his decidedly untraditional office is at 1219 Creative Co-Work Space + Art Gallery on N. Classen Blvd in Oklahoma City.  “At The Golding Group, we set ourselves apart from other business development professionals because we rely heavily on creativity,” he says. Thus his decision to offer co-working spaces as well as large and small offices for lease on a monthly basis. “My co-workers and I like to be around like-minded people because there’s an energy in that kind of environment. It’s been very good for all of us.”

“Everyone who’s in an office at 1219 started at one of the co-work desks,” says Kyle. Although it’s not an official incubator, business lessons rub off on the lessees as readily as linseed oil lends gleam to a table. “When people move out of the co-work desks and into one of our office spaces,” says Kyle, “their businesses are turning into successes.”