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Business, Marketing, Projects & Collaboration, Technology, The Latest News
The Golding Group is excited to announce our first venture capital partnership and launch of a new SaaS product and company: VORTTX Training and Testing After many months of development, testing, trial runs and field test the VORTTX Training system is now ready for public use. This private investment partnership is the first of many to come. The Golding Group are more than just consultants for hire, we create viable businesses out of ideas.
VORTTX is Virtual Online Tabletop Exercises for Healthcare Facilities. A better way to train facility staff! More captivating than traditional tabletop exercises and less expensive than 3rd party facilitators, the VORTTX scenario training changes variables, situations and outcomes based on the choices of staff for an evolving experience. With 3,000+ potential combinations, staff will not be disengaged by repeating situations or boring presentations.

The VORTTX system is a highly effective and efficient way to train and test facility staff in groups, teams or individual basis. Improve staff preparation while lowering training cost and scheduling hassles with the VORTTX online solution.
VORTTX is designed to be the most user-friendly variable outcome training solution available. Multi-part, multi-level scenarios provide a unique experience every time. VORTTX training utilizes shift, time-of-day and real world complications to present robust training and testing opportunities. For more information about VORTTX Training click here. For information about partnering with The Golding Group, please contact Kyle Golding in Oklahoma City.
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Media Relationships
NeoMarketing

 
 
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This week, Pritch wants to show some love to earned media. In particular, creating relationships with media sources and how to professionally pitch your story ideas. The key is doing a good job sending topics, news releases and story ideas with an actual “News Peg” to it and not everything your client wants “news” for. The relationship should work both ways, with you giving your media contacts tips on newsworthy events and stories that have nothing to do with you or your clients. Just a win for them. Special Guest: This week, President of PRSA-OKC Kristin Ewing, APR drops by to talk about current and upcoming events at PRSA. http://prsaokc.com/index.php Bonus Question: What’s the oddest thing you have ever been asked to do for client or boss? Subscribe to the NeoMarketing podcast on iTunes http://bit.ly/TheGoldingGroup and videos on YouTube http://bit.ly/GoldingGroupYouTube Every week on the NeoMarketing podcast, The Golding Group partners Pritch Pritchard, APR and Kyle Golding briefly (5-8 mins.) discuss best practices, latest trends and modern techniques for professional business communications including advertising, marketing, digital channels, social media, public relations and alternative options. Educational, informative and (hopefully) entertaining. http://thegoldinggroup.com Let’s engage. Follow us on
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Advice, Business, Marketing, Productivity, Public Relations, Social Media, The Latest News, Video

IABC-OKC Guest Speaker 8/4/16

Stop selling by features or price points. Tell a story, give an experience, create an attitude, embrace a lifestyle. Connect to your audience in deep, powerful ways for true loyalty. Let’s talk about how to make it happen on a regular basis.

Relationship-based content marketing can take your brand well past a logo and cutline to true fan club status. Watch the video for a ton of great information about how to best connect and create relationships with your best customer through your brand story: Simple, True, Consistent.

Kyle Golding Kyle Golding is a born #BusinessBuilder with more than 30 years of experience building, owning and operating multiple businesses. Golding has positioned, marketed and managed artist, musicians, start-ups, corporations and non-profits to local, national and worldwide success. Golding has won over 30 business marketing awards and honors, including 6 IABC Bronze Quill Awards. Along with The Golding Group, he also owns Share Furniture, is a partner at 1219 Creative Co-Work Space + Art Gallery and has investments in multiple start-ups/venture projects. Golding was featured in the February 2016 issue of Entrepreneur Magazine aboutWhat It Takes To Be A Creative Entrepreneur.”
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1.  Properly Thank Donors Unfortunately I’ve seen some real mistakes regarding this tip. Fundraising isn’t easy, just ask the leaders of the over 12,000 nonprofits in Oklahoma. Time and resources are often the largest challenges nonprofits face. But reducing your time by sending a carbon copy receipt from a receipt book to a donor who just wrote you a $100,000 check will only hurt you. Not all gifts require a phone call to say thank you or even a hand written thank you note, but I promise you will get back what you put in. Do it poorly, and you will most likely never get another large gift (or maybe even another gift at all) from this donor.

If you put forth some effort and properly say Thank You, you will build a relationship and ensure that this donor will be there for you again during your time of need or as part of their planned giving.

2.  Know Your Donors Fundraising has always been about relationships, but 2012 took a more personal approach. Simply submitting multiple grants to raise program and operational dollars is no longer the way to sustain your nonprofit. Individuals are the key. Get to know your donors including the individuals at the corporations and foundations that support your nonprofit. Learn their interests, why they support your cause and what will inspire them to increase or maintain their level of support.

If your donor only makes a contribution to nonprofits that take them to lunch and personally thank them, then take them to lunch. If your donor wants a thank you letter, send them a thank you letter. If your donor isn’t interested in your programs, but is interested in setting up an endowment to sustain your organization, than stop asking them for program support and meet with them to discuss an endowment.

Amy Braiterman, Principal Strategy Consultant for Blackbaud, recently published a great article about peer-to-peer fundraising. You can read it here.

3.  Learn the Meaning of the Word “Impact” As someone who reviews grant applications for individuals, family foundations and corporations, I have learned that many, many nonprofits do not truly understand the meaning of the word “impact”. If a funder wants to contribute to a program or cause that has a considerable “impact” do not send a request that outlines your general operations. These funders have a set budget of money that they can contribute. Only the nonprofits that clearly outline how those dollars would dramatically change the lives of clients or increase efficiency in operations will be granted these funds.

4.  Don’t Use Email or Social Media for Fundraising This will probably be a topic for the Golding Group well into 2013…and I almost want to say see tip number 2 – Know Your Donors when I give this tip. Before you send an impersonal email request or worse, a request via social media, to a donor for funding or an in-kind gift, please research your donor.

Retail, service and restaurant owners are very involved in social media and most probably like to see posts about how an in-kind contribution was used or a post thanking them for their support. However, most businesses do not like to be contacted this way for the funding request. Would you like someone to ask you for money in 140 characters or less? Probably not and neither do they.

In the long run, it’s all about relationships. Technology can have a negative impact on fundraising if you never actually talk to a donor. Hiding behind a computer is no way to get to know your donor, build a relationship and turn them into a long-term supporter of your nonprofit.

5.  Giving is UP in Oklahoma City This isn’t really a tip, but rather some encouragement. No one knows what will happen in 2013 and how the overall economy will be impacted. However one thing is for sure, we are doing what Oklahomans do best – taking care of our own.

A new study released by The Chronicle on Philanthropy ranks Oklahoma and the Oklahoma City Metro among the most charitable in the country. When it comes to the amount of discretionary income donated, Oklahomans gave 5.6% to charity. That’s the eleventh highest in the country. The Oklahoma City Metro gave $640.1 million in 2008, ranking it 45 of 366 metros in the country. Visit http://philanthropy.com/section/How-America-Gives/621/ to read the full article.

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This updated repost is part of my presentation this week at the Oklahoma Arts Conference. Enjoy! “How do you secure sponsorship for smaller, non-signature events?”. The biggest hurdle seemed to be businesses approaching these request “only as a marketing opportunity”. As a marketing director who handles non-profit donation and sponsorship request, I offered up this advice for making your event attractive for sponsorship:
  • Be prepared and professional. This is after all a business transaction. Do not pitch to my emotions but my business sense.
  • Have an offer. Do NOT present “whatever you want to do”. This makes me nervous. Marketing people are used to a defined relationship. We pay for ads or commercials and get a defined amount of space or time. Your approach should be the same. You can have options such as package A or B, but these should be spelled out.
  • Marketing is based on customer demographics. Tell me who is coming to your event. Also, tell me who is on your committee, supporting your organization and on your board. Give me the average age, income level and what they do for a living. If your audience is my target market, I will sponsor the event. The more information you have, the more interested I will be.
  • Provide me with event information, logos and marketing materials. I probably will provide additional promotion of your event for free.
  • My company has rules about how our logo can and cannot be used. If you make it clear that you understand this and will play by these rules, you are much more likely to get a yes from me. Ask for our style guide and you will win bonus points.
  • Most sponsorships include event tickets, but don’t stop there. Add perks that don’t cost you anything like reserved seating or a chance to meet with other sponsors and large donors. As a business leader, these are the people I am interested in meeting.
  • If I say no to a sponsorship or cash donation, do not hesitate to ask for in-kind support. Also, ask for referrals to other marketing directors and business owners who might be interested.
  • Be flexible. I might choose one of your sponsorship packages BUT have some additions or subtractions. Be open to suggestions which might open a new avenue of marketing you had not considered. If these suggestions are not good for your organization or cost extra money you cannot afford to spend, it’s OK to say no. Just give me a good reason why.
  • Do NOT promise something you cannot or will not deliver on. I will call you out on it and be very upset at not getting what I expected. I will tell other marketing professionals about my experience.
  • Tell me when and where the public will see the event marketing with my company name and/or logo on it. This includes invitations, brochures, e-mails, your website and social media, event signage, tickets, promotional items, gifts or goodie bags, speaker mentions and presentations during the event or any other associated items. Tell me how long this information will stay on your website or printed materials after the event has past.
  • Plan a public Thank You for your sponsors after the event is done. Make sure I know this is part of your marketing plan.
  • Send a follow-up item to our offices with your logo on it as a Thank You. All of my clients and employees will see it on a regular basis. This can be as elaborate as a trophy or plaque to as simple as a hand written note on letterhead.
  • Do not take a no as never. Ask again in the future, unless I very directly tell you not to. Sometime it’s just about timing.
  • Add me to your marketing list (email blast, mail, newsletter, etc…) it will make next year’s pitch even easier. Do this if we sponsor your event or not.
  • Remind me a portion of the sponsorship is tax deductible. Send me a tax letter with my thank you gift. Do not make me ask for it.
In the end, if you have a professional pitch, well developed with demographics and marketing opportunities spelled out, I will be interested in sponsoring your event. If I think you are easy to work with, will protect my brand and do what I expect of you then I am very likely to sponsor your event. Good luck!
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I was participating in a recent League of American Orchestras roundtable when the question was asked “How do you secure sponsorship for smaller, non-signature events?”. The biggest hurdle seemed to be businesses approaching these request “only as a marketing opportunity”. As a marketing director who handles non-profit donation and sponsorship request, I offered up this advice for making your event attractive for sponsorship:
  • Be prepared and professional. This is after all a business transaction. Do not pitch to my emotions but my business sense.
  • Have an offer. Do NOT present “whatever you want to do”. This makes me nervous. Marketing people are used to a defined relationship. We pay for ads or commercials and get a defined amount of space or time. Your approach should be the same. You can have options such as package A or B, but these should be spelled out.
  • Marketing is based on customer demographics. Tell me who is coming to your event. Also, tell me who is on your committee, supporting your organization and on your board. Give me the average age, income level and what they do for a living. If your audience is my target market, I will sponsor the event. The more information you have, the more interested I will be.
  • Provide me with event information, logos and marketing materials. I probably will provide additional promotion of your event for free.
  • My company has rules about how our logo can and cannot be used. If you make it clear that you understand this and will play by these rules, you are much more likely to get a yes from me. Ask for our style guide and you will win bonus points.
  • Most sponsorships include event tickets, but don’t stop there. Add perks that don’t cost you anything like reserved seating or a chance to meet with other sponsors and large donors. As a business leader, these are the people I am interested in meeting.
  • If I say no to a sponsorship or cash donation, do not hesitate to ask for in-kind support. Also, ask for referrals to other marketing directors and business owners who might be interested.
  • Be flexible. I might choose one of your sponsorship packages BUT have some additions or subtractions. Be open to suggestions which might open a new avenue of marketing you had not considered. If these suggestions are not good for your organization or cost extra money you cannot afford to spend, it’s OK to say no. Just give me a good reason why.
  • Do NOT promise something you cannot or will not deliver on. I will call you out on it and be very upset at not getting what I expected. I will tell other marketing professionals about my experience.
  • Tell me when and where the public will see the event marketing with my company name and/or logo on it. This includes invitations, brochures, e-mails, your website and social media, event signage, tickets, promotional items, gifts or goodie bags, speaker mentions and presentations during the event or any other associated items. Tell me how long this information will stay on your website or printed materials after the event has past.
  • Plan a public Thank You for your sponsors after the event is done. Make sure I know this is part of your marketing plan.
  • Send a follow-up item to our offices with your logo on it as a Thank You. All of my clients and employees will see it on a regular basis. This can be as elaborate as a trophy or plaque to as simple as a hand written note on letterhead.
  • Do not take a no as never. Ask again in the future, unless I very directly tell you not to. Sometime it’s just about timing.
  • Add me to your marketing list (email blast, mail, newsletter, etc…) it will make next year’s pitch even easier. Do this if we sponsor your event or not.
  • Remind me a portion of the sponsorship is tax deductible. Send me a tax letter with my thank you gift. Do not make me ask for it.
In the end, if you have a professional pitch, well developed with demographics and marketing opportunities spelled out, I will be interested in sponsoring your event. If I think you are easy to work with, will protect my brand and do what I expect of you then I am very likely to sponsor your event. Good luck!
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